Embarking on the Voyage: Types of Cruises

Sea cruise or River cruise your choice

5/4/20243 min read

black and white ship on sea during daytime
black and white ship on sea during daytime

Embarking on the Voyage: Types of Cruises

Ocean Cruise Liners: The Larger Ships to Adventure

Avid adventurers are drawn to ocean cruise liners and to the serenade of the sea. Each day brings a new port of call and a new adventure; with the ship so large, it offers extensive room service, a variety of specialty restaurants, and many opportunities for socialization. It is first and foremost the realm of the large ocean liner, a floating city of light. Remember, when we talk about an ocean liner, we’re talking about a ship that’s truly a ship — and not a vessel that dabbles as a hotel. It’s a floating city, more or less. And while it may not quite reach the size of some of our classic ships (think the Queen Mary 2 or even the now-notorious SS United States), it’s plenty big.

River Cruises: The Smaller Ships with Big Experiences

On the other hand, you'll find river ships and smaller ships like the Viking Longships offering an intimate experience. River cruise lines like Viking River Cruise give you a chance to explore smaller towns and cities, Frequently, the voyages of these smaller vessels have you starting and stopping right in the heart of a city, able to board or disembark with little more than a short walk. Two or three days in Salzburg with the Mozart connection, a seven-night voyage from Antwerp to Amsterdam, in a "large river boat" with just over 100 passengers, allows for more in-depth exploration of the shoreline and the places reached from it. (Caswell, 2016).Key Differences Between Ocean and River Cruises

One of the most significant differences between ocean and river cruises is motion sickness. While sea sickness is a concern for some on larger ships, especially during sea days, river cruises offer a smoother sailing experience, often without the motion sickness associated with ocean cruising.

The dining experience also varies between the two types of cruises. On ocean cruise lines, your main dining room is often a large restaurant, with options for specialty dining at various specialty restaurants. River cruises, however, often have a single main restaurant, serving local cuisine to reflect the culture of the small towns and cities you visit. Yet, the smaller size of the ship offers a more intimate dining experience, often with the chef explaining the local culture and inspiration behind the meal.

Which Cruise to Choose?

Sea or River: The Best Cruise for You

When it comes to deciding between sea and river cruises, keep in mind the size of the ship, the number of fellow passengers, and what you want to do on your vacation. If you love the thought of being at sea, with endless activities, and don't mind the potential for motion sickness, then sea cruises aboard large ships like ocean cruise liners might be your best bet.

On the other hand, if you prefer the slower pace of river cruising, want to avoid sea sickness, and value cultural exploration over onboard activities, then a river cruise could be a perfect holiday for you.

In the end, the best way to decide is to speak with a travel agent, who can guide you through the high seas and tranquil rivers to the cruise that best suits your travel style.

Whether you choose an ocean or river cruise, cruising is a great way to see new places, experience local culture, and create unforgettable travel memories. Before you choose, consider the key differences we've outlined. And remember, the choice comes down to what you want out of your trip. Happy cruising!

the eiffel tower towering over the city of paris
the eiffel tower towering over the city of paris
white ship on sea during sunset
white ship on sea during sunset
white and black ship on body of water
white and black ship on body of water
selective focus photography of jolly woman using peace hand gesture
selective focus photography of jolly woman using peace hand gesture
laughing woman while squatting
laughing woman while squatting